Mountain Biking In Oaxaca, Mexico With Amy Schweim (Podcast Interview)

Have you been hunkered down at home for the last few years, dreaming of mountain bike vacations? Well, now is your time to finally go get out there!

One great way to bike internationally is to join a tour group. I’ve done this in the past, and it’s super helpful. They help take care of all of the logistics, they know what the good trails and routes are, so all you have to do is ride your bike and enjoy yourself!

In this podcast episode, I chat with Amy Schweim from Women’s Radical Pursuits. She runs mountain bike trips to Oaxaca, Mexico (as well as other Latin American countries).

Even if you’re not interested in joining a tour (or going to Mexico), you’ll get some good tips on traveling internationally to bike.

Listen To The Interview

listen on apple podcasts

Other Interviews You Might Enjoy

About The Host

kristen bonkoski

Kristen Bonkoski is the founder and owner of Femme Cyclist.

An avid cyclist for a few decades now, she took to cycling during her late teen years — a time when she needed something to help boost her self-esteem and confidence.

Mission accomplished, the sport has become an important part of her life.  Kristen’s favorite disciplines are mountain biking and bike commuting, although you can also find her cranking out a century on her road bike and touring with her husband and son.  If it has to do with two wheels, she enjoys doing it.

Kristen is a certified USA Cycling coach, and she runs Rascal Rides, a website about biking with kids.

IG: @kristenlbonkoski

Connect With Radical Women’s Pursuits

Interview Transcript

Kristen  

Before we dive in, can you just take a moment to introduce yourself and tell everybody who Amy is?

Amy  

Yeah, thank you so much for having me. It’s surreal. It’s just fun. It’s an honor to be on this podcast. Yeah, so my name is Amy Shloime. I’m the founder, the owner of a company called women’s radical pursuits. And I created this, this company about whole goodness, like, six years ago, now I’ve been running chips for five years. My main mission and creating this, this company was really to bring women together. And build connections, essentially connection to self connection to others connection to, you know, different places in the world. Particularly I run trips right now down in Wahaca, Mexico, but we’ve, we’ve been down in Peru and South America and hoping to kind of get back into some other countries as well, after everything with the pandemic, but you know, yeah, it’s been kind of wild with that. So really, the big thing, though, is like, you know, just building those connections, not only like, you know, to go on a mile mountain bike trip and have an experience, but also to connect to culture, to connect to different terrain, different mountains, different, you know, people and lifestyle and ways of living and all the things that come with those adventures abroad that really have like, you know, really speak to my soul. And when I put it together, it was like really combining my own passions of mountain biking, yoga, cultural exploration, travel, and then, you know, taking these experiences that have impacted my life so, so much at really offering them to women that are, I guess, like me, and just wanderlust and love adventure, and being in the mountains and playing on bikes, and, you know, doing self care and yoga, and just all the things that helps us be our best selves and, you know, most healthy, vibrant selves. So,

Kristen  

um, can you tell us what a trip looks like?

Amy  

Yeah, absolutely. Yeah, actually, you know, I’m going to speak to Well, before I go into that, you know, I was running trips, and then the, when the pandemic happened, I pushed pause. And, you know, just, I mean, I guess honestly, it’s stressful enough leading trips, I mean, just with all the, you know, responsibility and legalities of like a mountain bike trip in the remote mountains of Mexico, that alone outside of a pandemic, to me, it’s just, I don’t know, it’s a lot of responsibility. And so with that added factor, and then the communities in the villages that we we traveled to that are such pillars of places we go to a lot of those places were shut down throughout the pandemic. So I I pushed pause, you know, for the trips, but also for myself, there was a lot personally that I was going through, and I took some time to kind of just revamp everything, and I’m really glad I did. And why I you know, wanted to speak to that is because there was a lot that happened even within women’s radical pursuits during that time I I pushed pause on the trips, but we during that time, we focused on getting bikes to kids in the villages where we adventure, you know, in travel to and through. And so we did a collaborative project with Project bike love with coyote adventures, my outfitter and Wahaca Tina Lee from every pedal in Durango, Colorado. And we came together and really focused on one of the villages in particular that I have a personal connection with with the kids and The community and we did a big fundraiser and we, we brought in, you know, we raised 10 grand, we got the kids bikes, we did the launch, actually last January, which was so it was just, I don’t know, I feel like this whole vision has just continued to kind of unfold and bloom and blossom in different ways. And really, it’s helped kind of refuel such a deeper meaning behind, I guess, this whole intention to build connections, you know, like, particularly with, then, you know, helping these kiddos and empowering them get on bikes and enjoy the things that we come through and get to do. So it’s been really fun. So I’ll, I’ll speak to what a trip looks like now, after that took place. Because before it was, like, you know, we would go down and it would be a combination of like, getting that cultural piece of the city, we do a like a cultural bike tour, we still do this on the trips moving forward, but you know, cultural city bike tour, which is like cruisers going around the city, getting the real layout of haka some of the history, the street art, things like that. And of course, you know, the markets and the vibrancy and the colors and all the things and then the, you know, the other pieces, then up in the villages up in the mountains, we used to ride like village to village stay in the cabins cabins are beautiful, it’s just like stepping back in time, when you get up there and your ride into these old trails that, you know, a lot of those those, the people that live there, they used to use these trails to come down into the city to sell their goods. So there’s just a lot of story, there’s a lot of like, rich, you know, indigenous culture and all of that in the mountains that I feel like adds an element of magic to it. You know, we saw we spent like a chunk of time up in the mountains doing that before and then we do this other like kind of hiking and mineral springs, waterfalls, yoga, you know, just all sorts of stuff was a big combination. But now moving forward, you know, the trip looks, it looks similar, but it’s a little bit different, you know, we start with that cultural city bike tour. And then, um, now we’re going to focus on the writing in this region of the mountains called extra heat, which is super cool, there’s a lot of, they actually do the the annual transfer, North day Enduro Racer, it’s an international release. So there’s like really awesome writing and just tons of trail system. So we’re going to this, you know, moving forward, we’ll we’ll kind of focus on that writing, because it’s number one, it’s so fun. It’s really well, you know, maintained, and there’s just tons of new trails always going in. So it’s really fun to just get a nice variety up there. And then the other part to it, you know, we’ll stay in the cabin still, but then we’ll go to this little village where we did the the bike launch, and we’ll actually ride with the kids, we’ll, you know, connect with them, spend some time in the village and just really, you know, take that time to, you know, fuel that project and part of the trips now the part of the profit, and the proceeds goes directly to project by glove Lucha Tao.

Amy  

So we have that element. And then as well as that there’s like a little up above the village. There’s spiritual sacred grounds where they do ceremonies, equinoxes, and things like that. So we hike up in the morning, one of the days with the kids and go do the ceremony. And it’s just, it’s just really, I feel like it’s just really sweet letter tau means Sacred Heart. And I just every time I go there, it’s like, I you feel that it’s just this little like, this, this little place of magic where just all the stress for me anyways, a lot of the ladies that I’ve taken through just speak to that, it’s like, oh, he just kind of stepped back in time. It’s really simple. It’s really sweet and really feels connective. Then we go back down into the city, we do the markets, we do the all the things, you know, the food, the markets, the we’ll also start doing the Temazcal like, kind of like the Native American sweat lodge, but it’s the indigenous to Wahaca it’s very similar, you know, but it’s the ceremony we’ve got that as well. This round and yeah, just you know, all the ways to really connect with the culture, the traditions, and then super fun as right after the trip ends. Dia de los Muertos starts in Wahaca so that’s like, who like festival tradition, just really rich, you know, again, culture, tradition and heritage and celebration. So I’m not running the trips during that anymore because that was a lot. Yeah, it was. Yeah, it was I kind of, you know, again, just like with the pandemic, it gave me time to really think about like, what what feels good and, you know, that way people can if if, you know, people want to extend their stay and kind of still experienced DDoS mortos they can do that outside of the trip as well. So that’s kind of that’s the short and sweet in a nutshell. What the trips entail.

Kristen  

And what is the riding like, what how many miles are you riding a day? Is it technical riding? Whatkind of level should a woman be at want to go on this trip?

Amy  

Yeah, that’s a great question. So that’s also changed. Like the the trails that we’re going to be writing an excerpt here, I would say, it’s like, pretty much like intermediate writing skills, you know, there’s definitely a combination of like, climbing and descent, we’re not going to be on super technical ones. There are those, you know, options up there. And we’ve done that in the past. But really, it’s like, I guess what I always come back to is like, it’s like, what, what am I you know, what am I wanting to, like, offer not only for others to experience but also for myself leading. And as I mentioned, you know, it is remote in Mexico. So, to me, it’s like, it’s about bringing women together, coming together in a really supportive, fun environment where we can get on bikes, we can ride and have fun and yeah, challenge ourselves, but have that like fun flowy single tracks, so that it’s not like super scary. Yeah, and, you know, there’s not like that huge, I guess, well, an added element of risk with like that high technicality, because I’ve led those trips down in Peru, and also in Wahaca, some other trails, and, you know, I think just where I’m at in my life with my riding, it’s like, that’s what I when I get on my bike, I just don’t want to have fun, I want to go flow, I want to like, so that’s, I would say, like, yeah, that intermediate is the skill level. Intermediate slash advanced, I would say the writing is at about between like, eight, like seven and 9000 feet, I guess I would say the range. So you know, it’s higher elevation. So there’s that factor. And then as far as mileage, you know, this year is going to be really different. Because we’re going to be doing a lot of like, you know, we’re going to basically shuttle up to this area will link a bunch of trails together, which are a combination of, of, you know, climbing and dissents. And then essentially, we’ll get picked up at the bottom and then go up and do a whole, you know, different stretch. So it’s like linking a bunch of trails together. So as far as mileage, it’s kind of hard to speak to that, I guess, in this moment, because it’s really different than the years past, right? Like, we would kind of average I think, in the past on a full day, maybe between 12 and 15 miles, somewhere in there. And I would guess we’ll be in that range, it’s just going to be a little bit different with that kind of shuttling and, you know, stuff like that, but, but also, I think what will be really fun about that is like really feeling into the group too, you know, with this, also, there’s option if people are getting really tired, you know, there’s an option to sit out around and, you know, people that want to really give it and go, you know, can can go on that one. So, so there’s a little bit more flexibility, I think, in that for people, versus before we would go from like one village to a next where it was like, Okay, you’re committed, yeah, 15 miles. And there was like, you know, some of the stuff in there was pretty technical. And there was even, you know, hike or bike and things like that. So I just, yeah, I don’t know, to me, this just feels a little bit more like relaxed. And that way it kind of meets people where they are as well. And like I said, really, with that intention of bringing women together to like, have this group camaraderie experience, that it’s like, yeah, we can ride your own ride, but we do it in a way that’s, like, supportive. And, to me, it’s what’s really important too, is that, you know, it’s, it’s like braking that I don’t know, just that like that non competitive. You know, like, I lived in a lot of Colorado ski towns, which I loved. And that’s where I started mountain biking. But I feel like there was always that element of like, going fast, and like having to keep up with everybody. And like, there’s just always this kind of vibe that it wasn’t until I moved and lived in Columbia, South America for a couple of years, I taught down there and I bought a bike when I was there. And I started writing. And I remember I was like, I really fell in love with riding again down there. Because I wasn’t it wasn’t about how fast I was going or how far I could ride or, you know what I could do? It was about the joy of just being on my bike. Yeah, so really, I feel like that’s where like mountain biking kind of shifted for me. And when I created women’s radical pursuits, that was that’s the intention, you know, to really bring together bring women together and a different kind of vibe, a different kind of dynamic, you know, we’re Yeah, you can still push yourself and you can, whatever, but it’s like, it’s like you and you, you know, and then with the group as far as that, like supportive group style experience, that’s way more than just like being on bikes, right? Because you’re like riding and Wahaca in southern Mexico and it’s just a totally different feel and experience. So I

Kristen  

love that I think that for me personally like we were talking about being in Colorado and being in that like very competitive vibe and finding your love the bike again. For me, it’s always I refined when I kind of start to lose that love. I refined it by doing something different, whether that’s like a different kind of riding than I’ve been doing or try I believe in somewhere completely different and doing some kind of new riding. But like, yes, switching things up so completely, it really helps you refine that love for biking. So I can see a trip like this being like, a good launching point for yourself if you’re not really feeling the riding anymore.

Amy  

For sure, absolutely. Yeah, exactly. I totally, I hear you and what you said, I find that too. And I think that’s what I love so much about, you know, going to other countries and writing, you know, and connecting with the local community there and like, what, just different even mountain bike community vibes. And, you know, even like, with the stuff, the writing in the mountains, in the villages, it’s like, we go into the little Commodores, which are like the little, you know, the kitchens and eat the traditional, like, well, how can food which is so good. And, you know, just like, that experience of just everything being new. It’s like your senses kind of come alive, right? You know, different singletrack different, like, I remember in Wahaca to the first time the big thing that was hardest was there’s a lot of ponderosa pine, it reminds me a lot of Drew and cheese sandwich, like okay, yeah, yeah. But what would happen is like, the trails would be covered with like those needles. And I remember that one of the most challenging parts was like getting used to that, because that would get really slippery. Like, if it was dry, it was super slippery. So I mean, that’s what I mean about, like, you know, you’re just, there’s just different little elements that I feel like you kind of come alive in a different way that it’s not just about like, Oh, I’m on my bike, and I’m, you know, going on a mountain bike ride, it’s like, there’s just so much other sensory things to kind of stimulate and experience in a different way. So yeah,

Kristen  

and I like the you’re giving such an immersive experience. It sounds like, like, I feel like so many Americans go to Mexico, and they go to an all inclusive resort. That’s like, yeah, you’re totally not experiencing the culture getting out there and seeing what it’s like. Totally, yeah. Sounds like a very different experience. Absolutely.

Amy  

Yeah, for sure. For sure. And, you know, it’s like, I get it to that, you know, it’s like, each their own some people like, you know, that’s what they want. And I don’t know, like, I guess I’ve always been wired to like, if I go travel somewhere, I want to get into like, the, the authentic, like really rich, you know, places that are going to give me a different kind of experience of why I’m like leaving, you know, the place where I’m coming from so, so yeah, that is really important for me, and I feel like, you know, I have to give huge kudos to my partner and Wahaca Carlos from coyote adventures, it’s just so fun to co lead and CO create with him, we have, I would say very similar visions as far as like weaving in, you know, really being intentional about weaving in those like indigenous practices and honoring the land and like, you know, connecting with community and making it so much more than just like a get on the bike and grind. And you know, just that, that and that’s, again, it’s like I get it, there’s some times that’s what people want, or maybe I would want or something, but you know, I guess to me, I don’t know, maybe it’s like getting older too. And just like finding different, like my values and what it’s important for in those connections as well. And then also, like, just, you know, we can learn so much, I think from different cultures and ways of life. And always, for me, every time I go down, I just feel like I have a new layer, or just a new perspective shift or something that happens, you know, and especially, like, I would say, it’s like, slowing down and like just really being grateful and appreciative for even things like clean water, and, you know, like, Oh my God, that’s always one every time and it’s like, yeah, of course, you can drink bottled water and stuff. But I mean, there’s just so much that I feel like we can get you know, when, I mean, I consider myself a privileged woman, you know, it’s like I, I, I acknowledge that. And so, you know, to be able to just like, like, really be able to acknowledge the things that can be easy to take for granted here. Sometimes, you know, or even, like, waiting in lines down there. You know, because I’ve lived in Mohawk, I’ve lived in Colombia, I’ve lived in Chile, and I love it. I love it, because it always brings me so much. I just feel like, everything slows down and it comes back into presence. And it’s like, you know, I just feel like I forget kind of the rat race and it’s, it feels like I’m way more connected to myself and to others in those places. And so, always there’s something to bring back, you know, whether it’s a perspective shift or a different way of seeing something, but those are just a few that I speak to, personally for me. Yeah.

Kristen  

Can you talk a little bit about the safety issue of going to Mexico I know that a lot of women hear that and they’re like, I can’t go to Mexico, Mexico. Poe isn’t safe.

Amy  

Yeah, absolutely, totally. Well, you know, I guess my first thing would all say is, you know, acknowledging that, like, really anywhere in the world, there’s, there’s risk, right? Like, even in the States, there’s places that, you know, when I lived, I lived in Minneapolis, I’m from Minnesota originally. And I’ll tell you what, of all the time that I lived in Colombia and Mexico, in places, you know, down south, honestly, in Minneapolis, I felt probably the most fear for for kind of the, you know, so So I only speak to that to say that, like, if we, you know, there’s, there’s places all over the world, right, that have risk for safety, and, you know, danger and things like that. As far as what haka what I would speak to where we go in the central like that, you know, touristy area is, like, it’s, I mean, it’s, it feels safe. You know, it’s like, there’s very low risk of, you know, a lot of the things that you hear in the news around Mexico. Sure, it exists, right, it’s but in the area that we go, especially like when we’re together in a group, and we’re in the City Central, I mean, it’s an international tourist destination. So what I always really love bringing women to Mexico, and to this place, in particular, to help really see that oh, wow. Like, oh, my God, these people are so Wow, they’re so nice. They’re so warm, they’re so kind, they’re so you know, so happy that we’re here. I mean, granted, you get a little bit of everything, right. But in general, I would say that’s the field. It’s like, it’s, it’s this international destination. So people, you know, the people that live there, it’s like, that tourists, the tourism is really what feeds there. I mean, it’s like, what really helps their economy thrive, right? So so we’re really you know, I’m, I’ve been down there now for almost seven years between living there and running my business that I feel really centered and, like, confident in places to bring groups and you know, we work with a local outfitter who’s like, in the know, you know, Tony, like 365 days a year, you know, he’s running his operations. So. So I feel like we navigate that in a way that’s, you know, helps and also helps acknowledge people, if they if they are a little scared, it’s like giving that extra support and TLC like through that. In fact, there was one girl on my first trip that came down, she was really terrified. At that time, you had to go through Mexico City as a connecting flight. Okay. Anyways, long story short, her flights, all the stuff that happened, and she ended up having to get on a bus to walk. And she was just like, and I guided her through the whole thing she got there. And now like, years after she’s been traveling to Wahaca alone, she’s been like, wow, going down there living there. You know, so like, to me, it’s like, again, it’s just like, helping people navigate that, you know, and recognizing that, yeah, there’s always there’s always risk, like, anywhere we are really, and when we can, like, you know, when we can be smart, and, you know, and educated and like knowledgeable about where we’re going, you know, stay rooted, like, you know, really listen to yourself and your intuition, things like that. And as a group, I feel like, you know, just that there’s, there’s that kind of power that safety in groups, for sure. And then also with the villages, oh, my God, when we, you know, head up into the mountains, it’s like, it’s just like, you’re like stepping back in time. You know, it’s like, there’s nothing to worry about up there. You’re in little cabins and ridin single track, and it’s just really like a lot of simplicity. There’s no you know, they in also in the villages in in Wahaca, they call it the Pueblos Mancha. Monado. So they work it’s like a whole system, how they, you know, like how they support toward each other community wise, with eco tourism. So they’re very, like, I would say, there’s a lot of vigilance and like their villages and this whole area that we go through. So, you know, there’s no, we don’t have to worry about like, you know, any shady stuff up in those in those areas, because it’s it’s such a connective place of community in these villages all working together for the, you know, the Eco tourism and whatnot.

Kristen  

For this October trip you have going on what are the dates, you still have some space available? If somebody’s listening and wants to know How can they do that?

Amy  

Yeah, absolutely. So first of all, the dates are October 21st through the 27th. With that said to Dia de los Muertos starts like right after that. So people, if somebody is listening, that’s interested, you could always extend the trip and spend that time as well. To experience that little flavor of Wahaca. And then as far as Yeah, we’ve got room right now for two more people to more women. And as far as getting, you know, any like, as far as like signing up or whatever, what I love to do is is connect with people first and have that Converse question because it is, you know, just want to make sure it’s the right fit for writing and for what people are looking for. And just making sure that’s all in alignment. So I have a website, women’s radical pursuits.com People can go to the contact and just send me an email. Also on social media, Facebook and Instagram, I’ve got women’s radical pursuit. So you can always people could pop on there and just kind of got a lot of posts about what haka and you know, whether you want to direct message or email me or however but yeah, I usually always start with the Connect call and a conversation. Yep. So yeah, very good.

Kristen  

October is a little too sporty coming up pretty fast for someone. Do you have trips planned for next year with what’s in the works?

Amy  

Yeah, yeah, great question. So we actually do have something brewing in the works in March, the dates are going to be early March, I believe we have third to the 10th. I’m partnering with a company called two wheel epics. And we are working on a project with also Coyote, the coyote adventures outfitter. To do a co Ed trip mountain bike trip, that’ll be pretty similar to what I’ve spoken to, we all kind of share a pretty similar vision and what we like to offer in these experiences, this one will be also to be helping to fund a bike project for the community of X to pay for the kids for, we’re looking at maybe even a pumptrack building something to that nature. So that’ll be our next one. And Mario’s really cool. Yeah, yeah. And then our vision is to get the two communities linked to the kids and lots of tau with extra pair here and be able to do the writing and the pumptrack. And just kind of keep expanding it throughout the communities that really want to be involved, you know, and they’re up there. They’re, they’re working, and they, you know, they help and assist and they cook and they do all the things right. And so it’s like, I guess all of us just that, you know, are are where it really stems from is like for the kids and the parents that want to ride and be a part of that just to really start to build that deeper connection of, of the communities to be able to do it together. And you know, then they can enjoy what we love going down there to do. Yeah, yes, I

Kristen  

love that. Yeah. Sweet. Um, do women come on these trips like all by themselves without knowing anybody?

Amy  

Yeah, they do? Yes, they do. Yeah, I’ve had both. Whether it’s, you know, not knowing anybody or I’ve had a my last group that I brought down, there was three of the girls all knew each other. They were in the kind of the Denver area. And then there was another woman from Alaska, and she didn’t know any of the girls. So there’s always kind of that combination. And then this next trip that we have coming up, a good friend of mine from years back and Buena Vista hurt. She’s bringing her sister, so that’ll go on. Oh, yeah. Yeah. So kind of a combination. You know, usually there’s a few people that might know each other. And yeah, some that come solo. So yeah. You

Kristen  

mentioned that you do yoga on these trips. Why yoga? And how was yoga good for mountain bikers?

Amy  

Yeah, great question. Well, I feel like I’m, you know, with the, I guess, my vision in this, what I like to offer and experiences is all about, like, balance, you know, so it’s kind of like that Yin and the Yang, right? For the Yang is like the mountain bike of the these adventures. And the Yen is the yoga. So with that said, it’s just like, you know, it’s really slowing down and bringing presence into the body. Getting into the breath. I do. I do some other work with yoga, and also breath work. So I guess it’s a personal thing, too. Like, I know, for many, many years, I would say like, my early 20s and even early 30s I feel like I was really out of balance. And I was way into that Yang that like, more masculine energy, even though I still did yoga, but I did yoga did like exercise. Yeah. So yeah, so I guess for me, you know, again, it kind of stems from my own personal journey of like, oh, man, like, too much Yang or too much in right, and we’re gonna be out of balance. So I really like to bring in yoga to these trips, just to again, it comes down to that connection piece. So first, its connection to self, you know, it’s like, really being grounded really being connected to the self by getting in your body and stretching and using the breath to like really ground and you know, kind of move from that place in how we connect them to others to the world, all that. And again, it’s like a personal thing, like, where I feel like a lot of my life, I was really dysregulated and I wasn’t connected. So it’s hard to build like those those deeper connections with people if we don’t have that with ourselves. Even the world right? It’s like if you’re super like, ah, like, you know, go on go on go on or anxious. It’s like I feel like we we miss things you know, miss the point, miss the moments because we’re just so focused on like, whatever. I don’t know, whatever we’re chasing sync. Yeah, yeah. Yep. So that’s a big part of why I bring the the yoga and and it’s like the yoga that I do. I mean, here in Sedona I teach goddess yoga, which is like a, it’s a yoga dance fusion. So I bring a little bit of that. It’s like a lot of sacred, like, belly dance inspired movements like hip circles, heart circles, but I also teach them I was certified in vinyasa, Hatha so I do a nice little balance. And then I also bring in a teacher and Wahaca, this woman, Laurie, who’s amazing, she’ll teach some of the classes as well, just to have that variety.

Kristen  

So it’s amazing. That was such a different answer than I was expecting. But I really liked it distract from being on the bike? And

Amy  

that that is one of them. Right? But yeah, I guess that’s a little bit bit deeper of the reason.

Kristen  

No, I really liked I don’t lie, I think. Yes. I think that a lot of mountain bikers, myself included, we tend to be so goal oriented, and so driven, and almost used sometimes, like mountain biking. Oh, it’s almost like a punishment. Right? And so this is what you’re talking about is that really is something that probably most of us need to work on.

Amy  

Totally. I know, I used it as a distraction. It was like, if I was feeling something, I was like, Okay, I’m gonna get on my bike, and I’ll work it out. And it was greatly Yeah, but I feel like it kind of missed, you know, it? Well, again, that’s my personal journey. But I was always kind of trying to run from it. So it’s just a way to meet ourselves, you know, in a deeper way more connected? And, yeah, really be with what’s there. 

Kristen  

In terms of traveling, what tips do you have? I mean, whether coming on one of these trips, or just traveling internationally, in general, what tips do you have for traveling with the bike? Or for traveling with all your bike gear?

Amy  

Yeah, great question. So traveling with the bike, actually, it’s funny, because I used to be terrified to do it, I was always like, Oh my God, it’s gonna be broken, or I’d worry so much. But you know, now doing it for so many years, it’s actually pretty darn easy. You know, whether it’s even the first time I went down, I just went to a bike shop and got a bike box, I literally use that and matted and packed really well. And then, you know, on the outside just had like, lots of like, fragile and, you know, handle with care, all the things that I feel like, also, you know, what I started to recognize, too, is like, well, airlines, if, you know, they’re not taking good care of like, the bikes and stuff, it’s like, that’s gonna be bad on the airline. So every time I would go, it’s like, My bike was fine. If it was like, in great, you know, nothing had happened or whatever. So then it was, you know, the more you do it, I guess, the more comfortable it’s like anything, but also you know, people have traveled with like bike, if you’ve got a official bike bag and things like that, just, you know, disassembling it to some degree taken handlebars off and pedals and, and then, you know, it just depends on the airlines, there’s always that oversized luggage price. So that’s the biggest thing. And just, you know, I would recommend, especially with airlines, and flights and stuff like that, these days, it’s like just calling and making sure that there’s space for the bike, things like that. But really, like, that’s, I mean, it’s pretty darn easy. It’s, you know, getting the bike box, maybe taking it to a bike shop, or doing it yourself to disassemble it. And then when you get to, or when people get to Wahaca. There’s a bike shop below coyote that they help put the bikes, you know, anything that needs help, or whatever. what else what else, there’s also, there’s also options to rent and Wahaca, it’s a little bit harder. They don’t have like, you know, a bike shop with like double suspension, what happens a lot is because there’s a large bike community down there. In fact, there’s a couple of riders that are even sponsored by some big companies up here, like Rocky Mountain, and I can’t remember the other one. But anyways, they have really nice bikes. And sometimes what what they’ll do if people can’t travel or bring their bike is, is they’ll rent from some of these local riders. They’ll just, you know, the bikes, they get them and all tuned up and everything and then just do a rental fee. So that’s always an option too. But yeah,

Kristen  

can you do bike flights down there?

Amy  

Oh, yeah. I’ve heard of that. You know, nobody, that’s we haven’t used it. Like any of the ladies that have come they’ve all just flown with their bike. But I would imagine Yeah, yeah, absolutely. Yeah, that’d be another option.

Kristen  

And I’ve got three final questions for you. Before I do that, is there anything else that you that I haven’t asked that you would like to share?

Amy  

Oh, you know, I don’t think I mean, the only thing is like I feel like doing this podcast today was like the perfect timing. So I just got back from Colorado and did some high country writing and like connected with a dear friend that came down on my first Wahaca trip actually, we went riding up on me was passed. And I just, I just feel really fired up and excited to you know, this is going to be the first trip after the pandemic, the one coming up in October. So I just feel like it feels really it feels right. It feels exciting. And it feels really fun to, you know, talk with you today and share, share more about it. Because for you know, it feels like a long time. It’s kind of been on pause and right. Yeah, kind of been that like, what is this going to look like? And am I going to do this again? And it’s really fun to be in this place again. New Beginning again. Yeah, absolutely. Yeah.

Kristen  

I just think this trip sounds absolutely fabulous. I went to Mexico for my first time in November, and went riding in Baja, and had such such a good time. So I’ve never been to Wahaca. But I just yeah, for anybody who’s been interested in going to another country to go ride her bike. It’s so worthwhile. It’s such a neat experience.

Cool. I’m so glad that you experienced that. That’s yeah,

Kristen  

yeah, it was amazing. Three final questions. The first one is what bike or bikes do you ride?

Amy  

So I’ve always written Conas Well, I should take that back. My first bike was a voodoo like a given to me in Crested Butte when I first moved there, I was like 22. But after that, when I finally started getting my own bikes, I love Conas and my current bike Amman is a Kona process. I got that in 2016 I believe it is. And I don’t know I guess I’m kind of old school. I ride it I ride my bikes until they everybody. Everybody’s like, you need a new bike. And I’m like, I know I probably do but I really liked this bike. So I did until I don’t like it or it doesn’t work. Yeah, yeah,

Kristen  

I’m gonna say my you gotta get your money’s worth out of it. You got to make it last not put it in a landfill.

Amy  

Totally interesting spender, you know, Peru and Mexico. I’m like, it’s got so much like deeper mental

Kristen  

Second one is what is your favorite place you’ve ever ridden your bike?

Amy  

Oh, my gosh, that’s hard. Woof. I write when you asked it. I did. Colorado came to mind because I just came back from there. And I had such a blast. i That’s where I learned a mountain bike. You know, it’s where I got into all this stuff. That’s where women’s radical for suits was born. So. And yeah, I would say Colorado is probably my tops. And then you know, but then it’s like, Peru and Mexico, Colombia. Like, I mean, there’s in Sedona, I just feel like there’s so many places, those are my tops. But, you know, I’m gonna go with Colorado because it just feels like it’s home turf. It’s like, there’s so much, you know, I just look back on my life. And like, all the things that I’ve learned through through mountain biking, and really, it’s all started there. And like, I think that was the thing going back and connecting with old friends. And in writing some of those trails. It was just like, and that’s where women’s reticle pursuits was born was like, in the Durango area. And that’s where I was just recently and so it feels really like yeah, there’s there’s a deep love for it. So yeah, I’ll stick with Colorado.

Kristen  

Final question is What is your favorite thing about riding your bike?

Amy  

My favorite thing is like, like being on the downhill with like, the wind in your hair and like dirt all you know, just like that feeling of freedom that just going downhill, just getting that that flow state right where everything just feels like it just melts away. And there’s big ass grin on your face. Like, you know, wind in your hair, dirt on your dirt all over it. Like, I just love it. Yeah, that’s my favorite part of it. I would say that and also, you know, it’s like being in nature in the mountains. I love being outside. And then you’ve got a kick ass group of women and giggling and having fun. It’s like, Oh my God. That’s That’s it. I love it.

Are You Listening To The Femme Cyclist Podcast?!?

listen on apple podcasts

A podcast for women who love bicycles! We we celebrate all forms of riding and all forms of women, so whether you’re a road cyclist, mountain biker, or bike commuter, you’ll find your community here. Each week we’ll week bring you interviews from inspiring women, and offer tips and tricks to help you thrive on the bike.

Leave a Comment