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Body and Size Diversity And Inclusivity With Jennifer Kriske From Machines For Freedom

What happens when you can’t find a pair of bike shorts that feel just right? You create your own!  Well, that’s what you do if you’re Jennifer Kriske at least.

Jenn is the founder of Machines For Freedom, a cycling apparel company with products designed specifically for women.  They make high-quality, intelligently designed, and visually stunning pieces of clothing.  When we poll our community about their favorite cycling apparel brands, Machines For Freedom is always high on the list.

In this episode, I chat with Jenn about how the company got started, how they’ve promoted diversity, and what it’s like being a woman in a heavily male dominated industry.  

(And if you’re not already familiar with Machines For Freedom, make sure to check out my reviews).

Other Things We Chat About

  • Why Jennifer started Machines For Freedom and how her background in hospitality and design helped her get it off the ground.
  • Exploring the world by bike, and some of Jenn’s favorite cycling trips.
  • What makes a good cycling bib.
  • How Machines For Freedom has promoted body and size diversity and inclusivity through their products and photography.
  • How the pandemic has impacted Jenn, Machines For Freedom, and the cycling industry in general.
  • What it’s like being a woman in a heavily male dominated industry.
  • Why we should explore all forms/disciplines of cycling.
  • How different disciplines of cycling can benefit us at different points in our life.

Links Mentioned In The Episode

Connect With Jennifer & Machines For Freedom

Connect With Femme Cyclist

Listen To The Femme Cyclist Podcast On Your Favorite Podcast App


Full Jennifer Kriske Interview Transcript

Kristen
So let’s get started by having you tell us just a little bit about yourself. And who is Jen?

Jenn
Who’s Jenn? Oh, what a loaded question!

I am a So Cal native. I grew up here in Los Angeles, and actually had a long career in interior design. I was in restaurant and hotel design for a very long time before I broke away from that and started Machines

So I guess when it comes to my work and my career, I’ve always just sort of been this mix of design, brand and business on all my careers have kind of culminated in that intersection. So that’s how I landed with what I’m doing now: starting a brand and launching Machines For Freedom

Kristen
How did you get started cycling?

Jenn
That started when I was working at this one restaurant group. And the hours were just really grueling. And it was the kind of job that was just pulling me in every different direction. I was working with a lot of contractors, a lot of craftsmen, I was basically the owners rep for a large restaurant chain here in the States.

And so I found cycling to be my reprieve from all of that. And I kind of joke, sometimes I called it my extreme form of self care, because I just really loved being out in the mountains for like hours on end, and nobody could reach me, you know, maybe my cell phone, maybe it didn’t.

And after just like pedaling my bike for an hour, finally, my brain would start to quiet down and I would stop thinking about my to do list and stop thinking about all of the things I need to do for work. And I could really start thinking about myself, I could start daydreaming, you know, I could just have that personal time to myself, where I really wasn’t distracted.

And so then I just got hooked. We have so many beautiful mountains out here in LA, and such different types of topography here in LA. And so I really just enjoyed exploring my city, you know, and then exploring different cities and then exploring different countries, you know, all by bike. So that’s really how it all started.

Kristen
Yeah, that’s been such a big part of cycling for me too. It really gives you a way to explore the world. I feel like when I travel places, I don’t just go and see what everybody else sees. I get to go ride my bike there and see the world.

Jenn
Yeah. When I travel, I really like to have a mission. You know, I’m not a good tourist. I could do that for like a day or two. But my favorite vacations have been randonees and point to point bike rides, where I still have an objective, even if it’s simple: just get from A to B. But yeah, I really like having that goal associated with my trips.

Kristen
What is your favorite trip you’ve taken?

Jenn
Probably my trip to Patagonia that was eight days. And it was equal parts gravel and road. And that one was really fun because basically every stop ended at a place with a natural Cold Spring of some sort, some sort of like freezing cold water, and then like hot springs.

So you would just like do these cold plunges when you got back to like, I don’t know, just get all that lactic acid out of your muscles, and then sit in a steam room or a hot spring and then you eat a really good meal and go to sleep. And it was just like absolutely lovely.

Kristen
That sounds amazing. Patagonia is on my bucket list, but I haven’t been yet.

Jenn
Yeah, it’s a good one. I highly recommend it.

Kristen
Was that through a specific company that you did that?

Jenn
No, it was with a group in LA called the fireflies. It’s a organization that leads rides, raising money for City Of Hope. It’s a lot of people from the advertising and production world so they have people all over the world.

And then it was a company down in Chile that hosted this one which was great because they’re like a location scouting services company hosting the thrive so they like knew all the really amazing places to go

Kristen
And then how did you end up coming up with this idea for Machines For Freedom?

Jenn
I’d only been cycling for a couple years, and my training was getting more and more intense. And at the time, I was training for a trip through the Pyrenees where I was going to be riding for six days, and we were traversing like three mountain passes a day.

It was a really, really big trip and bigger than anything I’d ever attempted to ride before. And as I started training for this, I was just having more and more problems, basically, like saddle issues, what I thought were saddle issues. And I started working with a bike fitter, and we got my bike fit really dialed, we got me on the right saddle, that was the right width. And I felt really confident about all the gear, but then I was still having discomfort on really long rides. And when I talked to him, he was basically like, you know, I said, so many women, and they all sort of have the same complaints. And that’s just like me to get really frustrated. He’s like, honestly, it’s just there really isn’t a good pair of bibs for women out there, huh.

And that just sort of made me mad, you know, because there was like a lot of very expensive bibs. And there was a lot of quality in manufacturing and quality of fabrics and things like that. But as I started to dig into it, it just became really apparent that the level of quality that was going into the men’s line was not being translated equally into the women’s line, companies just were putting out women’s gear because they knew they needed to because women were asking for it, but they weren’t putting the same time and effort into it. And that showed in the performance and in the fit.

So then that’s when my design brain started working. And I was just really frustrated. I was like, well, this is ridiculous. I’m just going to design something myself. And you know, the bib that I want to wear and the kit that I want to wear. And hopefully I can solve this problem for some other women, as well. And that’s when I started to hit the pavement and seek out suppliers and manufacturer and all of that.

Kristen
So what are some of those things that you think make a good short that you were looking for that didn’t exist?

Jenn
You know, a lot of it boils down to the chamois. A lot of times, you’ll still find chamois that are too narrow. And so it’s not going to encompass the full range of sit bone widths for women. And that was one of my problems. Like I find my sit bones sitting like on the very edges of the chamois which isn’t good. And then actually can kind of like cause more problems because now like the chamois is bunching where I shouldn’t be bunching and things like that.

Also chamois placement. I ran into issues where like it was a great chamois. And the chamois might be wide enough, but it was just so poorly misplaced in the short that again, it wasn’t going to do its job. And then also just the overall fit. And things may have gotten better now.

But back then, basically, you know, these companies that just saw women’s bodies as this mysterious thing that they didn’t know how to solve for. Why do you see our bodies as like such a problem, you know? Yeah. And so what people ended up doing because women’s bodies tend to be most different from the waist down. Whereas men tend to have more difference in the waist up is something that I have learned.

And so the way that a lot of companies would solve for this is they would use like a really stretchy fabric. And then you’d have the rubber band around your thigh, everything in place. And so then that’s how you ended up with this like sausage like look.

But I found that if you got all over compression, and you went for a more compressive fit throughout the whole bid, then that tightness just around your side wasn’t as crucial to keeping that chamois like locked in place. So we really went for all over compression, which we sort of jokingly call Spanx for the bike.

Kristen
So I’ve been testing a pair of your bibsout. And when I first put them on, I felt like holy crap, these don’t fit! I ordered too small! But now I’ve gotten used to it. And that compression is kind of cool.

Jenn
Yeah, I even just some days, like I just like that compressive feel all the time. It feels good. Like it feels good around my midsection. It feels good around my guys like it now when I wear something that I don’t feel held in. And that way when I’m riding, I can tell the difference.

Kristen
It’s kind of like a hug.

Jenn
It is kind of like a hug.

Kristen
So aside from the design of your clothing, what else makes Machines For Freedom unique or what helps differentiate it from other brands out there?

Jenn
I guess a lot of things I mean, in our product ethos, we really tried to follow like more modern fashion trends. You know, I don’t know if you’ve had this experience, but sometimes when you’re shopping for a kit, and you’ll go onto a website and you’ll look at all the different jerseys that are offered all the different bibs are offered, and I don’t know about you. Have you seen that movie lost in translation?

Kristen
Yeah.

Jenn
There’s a theme at the restaurant and they’re in the Japanese restaurant and they look at the menu and pictures and it all is like looks like the same thing. Right?

I sometimes have had I feel like when I’m shopping on some of these websites, yeah, I don’t even understand the difference, you know, right. And so there’s just like there’s such as homogenous look when it comes to cycling kit. And so we really wanted to change that we wanted to allow for expression of personal style, we wanted to allow for more playful prints and colors.

And also just like a more feminine look. You know, because a lot of times too you’ll look at it like a men’s kit and women’s kit side by side. side. And again, you can barely see any differences, you know. So we really wanted to embrace femininity in the sport. So aesthetically, I think that’s what really sets us apart.

And we’ve become really known for our prints now. And then also, ethos wise, you know, the other problem that I saw when I first started out was this real disconnect between consumers and the market and the industry, where you had a lot of consumers like asking for better representation asking for like a place in the sport. And we’re really just being ignored by the industry.

And I feel the market size is big enough to warrant that kind of attention, or whatever the rationale was, you know, that’s when you have solutions, like women’s corners, where you’re basically like, isolated to like a small section of a store, and things like that. And I don’t know, it didn’t gel with the community that I saw here in LA and the community of writers that I had at the time. And so I really wanted to not change what the sport look like, because in actuality, the sport already looked like this, but change how it was presented, and show the different types of people that are writing showing different styles of writing, I guess it kind of went back to that place of being able to have individuality in a sport that really promotes homogeny.

Kristen
What do you think you have done to help promote diversity?

Jenn
The big thing is, through our photography and our campaigns, our marketing, we spend a lot of energy, I should say my team spends a lot of energy, really like finding new people and new faces. And so you know, back when we launched back in, like 2014, I don’t know if you remember the scene back then. But especially when it came to women’s marketing, you sort of saw like the same faces and every campaign, from an outsider’s view in you would think that the community was really small, because it’s like, in marketing campaigns, it looks like the community of women is like only these, like 10 people.

So right, we spent a lot of work finding people that hadn’t been featured in this way. And that’s been our ethos from the very beginning, as we’re like constantly, like scouring Instagram, and scouring the internet for new faces and new personalities and new points of view, that we can amplify we can elevate.

Kristen
One thing that I’ve really been impressed by too, is just the very large range of sizes that you offer. You know, usually a lot of the brands, you’ll get like small, medium, and large. And those are the only options.

Jenn
Yeah,that’s a really interesting project for me, because it did sort of come late in the game, we launched our inclusive sizing just this past year. And it took a lot of development for us, because we really wanted to get it right. Like a lot of times when people are offering these expanded sizes, they’re still working from the same base size, and they’re just grading up. And the further away you get from that base size, the proportions can start to get a little out of whack. And so we really wanted to have a more thorough process through all of this. So we weren’t just like grading up, but we were actually fitting along the way as well to check ourselves you know, and make sure that the person that buys the small is going to get the same quality of it as a person’s buying the two x. So we kind of like went back through all of our existing styles and addressed it in that way.

I remember when I first launched the brand, I had some shop owners telling me like don’t even bother making an extra large because you won’t sell any. And that’s not true at all. Like they started featuring a curvier model on our website, like we immediately started selling those sizes.

So you know, it really wasn’t a matter of like, you’re not selling the sizes, because the people that wear those sizes just had been so disappointed so many times by not finding what they’re looking for in a store, that they’re just not going to you you know, so you’re really consumer base, it was really touching. Because after we launched, we had seated out a bunch of product to a bunch of like bloggers and influencers in the space and send them product. And we wanted them to just give honest feedback about how they liked it. They didn’t like it. We didn’t ask them to say anything in particular, we just really wanted their honest views. And there was this one blogger in particular that wrote the most touching story about how almost traumatic clothing buying can be sometimes because I think she was a three X was the size that she wore, and how many times she’d walk into stores and the tag would be in her size. But then when she went to try it on, like she couldn’t even get it up over her like hips or something. Yeah.

When that happens over and over and over again, I can speak from my own experience, you start to think like something must be wrong with my body. All of these clothes say that they’re supposed to fit me and they say them with my size, but like, it’s not even close to fitting me. And so like what’s wrong with me, you know, and you start to internalize it. And so then you just sort of you don’t even want to try anymore. You know you try those clothes on anymore. And because it’s just like it’s such a not a fun experience. So, so she got our kit and she felt kind of like nervous, right because she never even bothered really, with especially higher end higher priced products because that’s where she tended to have these negative experiences. And so she was just like preparing herself for disappointing.

And then she put it on and she’s like, Oh my god, it fits like a glove. And she was so excited because like, you know, it’s like finally one of these really high quality product that feels like it was just made for me. And I think that that’s an experience that you can’t relate with, when you’re a sample size, you know, because everything is just made to fit you.

I mean, I can speak from experience that like when you know, you just want a pair of jeans, and you have to try on 20 or 30 for you find one that doesn’t just like flatter you. But that just fits. And it can be really, really tiring experience. So I was just really thrilled that we were able to kind of make that person’s day and give her a product that you’re really excited about.

Kristen
Yeah, I think that’s so important. Because it’s not just a piece of clothing, right? It’s not just this nice pair of shorts that feel good and fit well. But it’s feeling like actually welcome in the sport, too. I think if you go and try on shorts, and you can’t find a pair of shorts that fit you, then you’re gonna feel like maybe this isn’t the sport for me. Yeah, so I love that. I just think it’s like more inviting of a wide variety of women.

Jenn
Yeah, I mean, just having the clothes to do the sport. So it’s a base level for entry into the sport.

Kristen
So you mentioned before that your shorts are kind of pricey, which they are. Why or when do you think someone should be spending that much money on a pair of cycling shorts?

Jenn
I think that when it comes to shorts, and when it comes to shoes, those are two areas where it’s worth the money, especially shorts. I think even on shorter distances, the shorts are really important as you can get away with a pair of shoes that don’t fit quite right for shorter distances.

Once you’re getting up into longer distances, like those are the two points of contact with the bike. And those are two points of contact, when you’re doing road that don’t really move much. It’s like really in a fixed position for a very long time. And so that’s where you’re gonna have a lot of issues, and you could have injuries, you don’t have gear that fits you well.

So that’s why I tell people like if you are on a budget, put your money into those areas, and then you can get away with something less expensive for the jersey or for the top. You could even throw on a T shirt and just have some sort of fanny pack or like a bike bag or something if you really wanted. So yeah, those are the two areas really invest in it.

When it comes to bibs, a lot of time bibs and shorts, a lot of times you are getting what you paid for, because so much of the price is the factory costs, you know, that I’m paying for those products is in like the chamois and the fabrics.

So when you’re buying something that’s a lower price point, that’s usually where a company is skimping. And those are the two areas that like could make or break your ride and make or break your comfort on a ride.

Kristen
So what does your supply chain look like? Where are the shorts made? What have you done to make sure that your supply chain is sustainable?

Jenn
We get all of our materials out of Europe, mostly Italy, in some Switzerland. And then everything’s manufactured in China, which is where I found just the best technical sewing to be honest.

It’s interesting because like you tried to find technical sewing here in the States, and it is so hard. There’s not a lot of it. And where there is, the price is astronomical.

So we work with a couple different factories in China, that work on different scales for our different products. They just make a really amazing product, really durable product. And then that comes to us here in the States. And so far, like knock on wood. We’ve had some setbacks with the pandemic, for sure. We’ve definitely noticed how it’s just caused everything to slow down. But we haven’t had any like major hiccups. Like I just had to learn the art of patience.

Kristen
So aside from the supply chain, how has the pandemic been for your business?

Jenn
It’s been really interesting. I’m sure. You know, being in this space, you’ve heard a lot about the bike, boom, yeah. Which is very real.

You know, we launched our short right when all of this was starting to happen. We’ve definitely noticed an uptick in sales on our websites. And it was so interesting, because I remember when everything first started, you know, I was prepared for our sales to just completely dry up, right? Because I was like, you know, people are going to be nervous about the economy, people are losing their jobs. The last thing people are gonna want to buy is an expensive pair of bike shorts or kit.

And then it didn’t know I was like, Okay, and then we started to hear about how like bike sales were just like exploding, but I still like brace myself because I was like, okay, like people getting on bikes for the first time are people buying bikes as alternate forms of transportation. That’s still a very different rider than somebody that’s going to buy a kit. Yes. I still don’t know if that’s gonna necessarily trickle over into what we do. But then again, like it didn’t slow down, and it actually started to pick up and we started to have struggles with keeping up with the demand. Yeah, you know, it’s been really good.

What I’m most excited about is how cycling is starting to finally penetrate the more general public and finally penetrate the outdoor markets. Because for the longest time, it’s like the last Your outdoor world has always been so separate from cycling and like mountain biking kind of crossover, but not really. But now you’re starting to see like outdoor publications, outdoor retailers, like larger outdoor brands really embraced the sport of cycling. And so I hope that that’s a sign of things to come. Because I really think what’s best for the sport, cycling sort of done on its own island for a very long time. And it really needs to be more embraced by the general public.

I think even on terms of safety, you know, like for people to see cyclists as just human beings and not like an obstacle on the road is so important for safety around cities and things like that, and, and for even for cities to be motivated to put in better infrastructure. So I hope that this is a really exciting shift for the industry as a whole.

Kristen
Yeah, I agree. I hope to that so many of these people coming into the sport right now. don’t give it up once the pandemic is over. I hope that this is a permanent elevation for the industry.

Jenn
Yeah, I mean, I, for those first few weeks of the pandemic, here in LA, when everyone was on lockdown, I have never seen the sky. So clear in Los Angeles and my entire life. I mean, I hear what was really amazing was how fast it cleared up to like, within a week, we had blue skies, like the normal L.A. smog, that is always kind of just like a haze sitting in our sky, like, for decades, went away almost overnight, as soon as all the cars got off the road, right.

So it was such a visual impact of like, we can reverse this, if we put our mind to it, you know, and it actually doesn’t take a whole lot of energy on our part. It’s just like, changes in behavior in our daily behavior can really make a difference in the environment. And so I hope cities are really paying attention and start to help with that infrastructure to make it a little bit more easy and accessible for people to commute.

Kristen
Yes, very much. So I think the other thing aside just from the environment, but like for our lives, too, is that during the pandemic, you know, at the beginning, I didn’t drive my car anywhere for like a month and a half. Yeah. And it was like, my life was better. I didn’t miss driving anywhere, we were able to just bike to the grocery store and work from home. And I hope other people have seen that too. Our lives are just better when we don’t drive as much.

Jenn
Yeah, like my stress level goes down when I’m not driving, you know, and I’m not sitting in traffic. You know, it’s crazy. I even I mean, this is LA for you. But for a long time I had a very long commute is like an hour plus depending on the day each way. And then I started developing like a knee issue. And so I thought for sure was like my writing. And I was like doing all these things. My bike fit, like going to PT and like also trying to figure out like, why is my knee bothering me. And then I stopped driving for a while and the knee issue went away. And then all of a sudden, I was like, Wait a second, it’s my right leg. And thats what I use to drive. And I was like I literally developing my carpal tunnel in my knee from sitting in stop and go traffic all the time. You know, crazy. Yeah, this is wild.

Kristen
Yeah, but you always hear about like how bad it is to set it at a desk all day. But I guess you don’t hear as much that it’s bad for your health to sit in a car all day either.

What has it been like for you being a woman working in a cycling industry? It’s such a heavily male dominated industr

Jenn
That’s a good question. And I think about it a lot, because I actually, I’ve worked in a lot of very male dominated industries. I worked in entertainment for a little while, like right out of college, and then spent a long time in interior design and architecture, which you would think was maybe not so male dominated, but in the restaurant space. And when I was really heavily involved in the construction side and the design build side, it was very male dominated.

And I’ve definitely struggled the most in the cycling industry, like I feel the sexism in the strongest industry. And I don’t know if that’s a result of the industry, or because I’m operating also at a higher more executive level. And so it’s just like, the further up the ladder you get, the more the more you feel it, you know, yeah, the harder it is to penetrate. I don’t know which one it is, or maybe it’s a combination of both. But yeah, no, it is strong.

You know, there’s environments that I find myself in where I know, deep in my gut that if Machines was a men’s brand, you know, I was the person that like brought this men’s brand into the space that I’d be getting high fives left and right.

Yeah, because it’s a women’s brand, I’m kind of ignored or not taken seriously. So that kind of stuff happens a lot. And there’s just a lot of energy spent having to prove myself over and over and over again. Whereas male counterpart would already be accepted as being accomplished in certain areas based on my track record.

Kristen
Are there any other women owned businesses in the bike industry that you’ve been able to connect with?

Jenn
I mean, there are a handful. I’m sure Wheelworks comes to mind. They’re not based locally, so I haven’t gotten to connect with them in real life. But yeah, there are a handful out there that are fighting the good fight.

Kristen
What is next for Machines For Freedom? Where do you see things going from here?

Jenn
I’m really excited about how there’s more crossover in the sport, right, you’re seeing more athletes go from like road to gravel, the mountain, and people are less siloed. And that discipline of cycling, but they do excited about that cross pollination within the sport, and really excited to create close that beak to all those different modes of getting around by two wheels.

I think there’s still so much room for innovation when it comes to product that is designed for women that I mean, the product side is really like what I get excited about so and we do have some new things in the works coming this year coming next year. So I’m excited to bring new product to the market.

This past year, we finally really been able to focus on product development. And so a lot of ideas that have been sitting on the back burner and sitting on my to-do list for a long time we’re finally bringing to the market and it’s really exciting to watch those pieces come together and watch things develop.

Kristen
I love that you talked a little bit about that cross pollination because with Femme Cyclist, you know, when I started I was like, should this be a mountain bike thing? Should this be a road cycling thing? But I like all forms of bicycles. And it’s always hard for me to believe that anybody could love a bicycle and not want to do it all.

Jenn
Yeah, it’s so great. Like, I don’t know about you, but I haven’t touched my road bike in months. And I started out being like, hardcore roadie. Yeah, I’ve been really into my mountain bike recently. And I’m having so much fun. It’s just like, I guess I just needed like a change of pace. I kind of like it’s a different feel. You’re kind of like dodging obstacles, it feels more fun and playful. Versus road bike was more like hardcore training. It’s such a different mindset to like, on my road bike, I can like meditate zone out.

Basically, you’re keeping your eyes peeled for like major rocks in the road. But for the most part, you can kind of get into that more meditative state. And then when I’m not on the dirt trails, like I have to be more aware, you know, because you’re constantly having to like pick your line and strategize. And so it almost looks like it works different parts of my brain to yeah, oh, yeah, I love kind of bouncing back and forth from different modes of riding.

Kristen
Yeah, it kind oflike that for me, too. It helps me to not burn out. Llike, I’ll start getting sick of road biking and then I switch over. I just start commuting for a while, or I just start mountain biking for a while.

Jenn
You know, maybe also because I trained like, road cycling was always really synonymous with training for me, like I always had a training plan, I had to hit certain goals. And I don’t have that with mountain biking. So I’m able to take it a little bit more casually and the pressures off.

Kristen
So I’ve got three final questions for you. But before I ask those, where can people buy Machines For Freedom?

Jenn
You can find us on MachinesForFreedom.com. That’s our website where you can purchase clothing. And then you can also follow us on Instagram at machines for freedom.

Kristen
Very good. So first question is, what is your favorite place you’ve ever biked? And we may have already covered this, but go ahead.

Jenn
Patagonia was definitely a highlight for sure. And then honestly, in terms of local rides, there’s a ride here, Crystal Lake, it’s a pretty epic climb. It’s like 26 miles uphill. And that section at the top when you descend, people might think I’m crazy. But the top that descent there is better than anything I experienced in Europe,. So I know there might be some people listening they’re gonna think I’m crazy. But I absolutely love that road to descend.

Kristen
Second question is what kind of bike or bikes do you ride?

Jenn
I ride a Parlee road bike, I’ve had that bike for, gosh, almost like over 10 years now. I’ve probably put about 70 or 80,000 miles on it and we’ve gone on so many adventures together. So you know, it’s just like, fits me like a glove.

And then I have a Specialized Stumpjumper is my mountain bike, my full squish, which is so much fun. And then I also have a custom Stinner gravel bike, the steel frame. That’s what I took to the Pyrenees.

Kristen
Final question is what do you love most about riding your bike?

Jenn
I would say it’s, it’s the time that I get to spend with friends. I love that sort of shared experience, especially right now with being so isolated from people.

Getting out on the trails with my friends right now has really been a lifeline. For me, it’s fun, you know, we get the opportunity to like share stories. And I tend to have better conversations with people when I’m out, exercising with them and like sharing in that kind of shared adventure with them than if we were just like sitting at a bar or sitting at a restaurant chatting. So I would say it’s that shared experience that I like the most.

Kristen
That’s very true for me, too. Everybody always jokes because I don’t really want to socialize unless you want to ride bikes with me.

Jenn
It’s kind of nice because you can like socialize a little bit and then when you are tired of socializing, you can just like ride off and do your thing.

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