Conquering Imposter Syndrome With Shanna Powell (aka Endless Bike Girl)

If you’ve ever struggled with imposter syndrome, this episode is for you! Shanna Powell (aka Endless Bike Girl) is a badass business owner, bike industry veteran, and mountain bike skills coach. She even has a Shredly bike short named after her.

If ever there was a cool girl, Shanna is it. And yet, in this podcast episode she shares that she’s struggled with imposter syndrome over the years. Or, the “fraud police” as she’s coined it.

This interview is such a good reminder to go out and live the life you want regardless of whether or not you think you’re good enough.

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About The Host

kristen bonkoski

Kristen Bonkoski is the founder and owner of Femme Cyclist.

An avid cyclist for a few decades now, she took to cycling during her late teen years — a time when she needed something to help boost her self-esteem and confidence.

Mission accomplished, the sport has become an important part of her life.  Kristen’s favorite disciplines are mountain biking and bike commuting, although you can also find her cranking out a century on her road bike and touring with her husband and son.  If it has to do with two wheels, she enjoys doing it.

Kristen is a certified USA Cycling coach, and she runs Rascal Rides, a website about biking with kids.

IG: @femme_cyclist

Full Transcript

Kristen
Shanna, thank you for being here today. And just to get started the same way I start every episode, would you mind introducing yourself for anyone who has never heard of Shanna Powell who are you and what are you up to?

Shanna
Well, my name is Shanna Powell. I live in Brevard, North Carolina. Some of you may know me as Endless Bike Girl. And at the moment I shuffle my life between shuffling bike parts and teaching people how to ride mountain bikes better.

Kristen
Very good. And you’ve had this like varied experience in the bike industry worked for Industry Nine, you own your own company, Endless Bike Co. You are a mountain bike coach. Why have you decided to make biking your career?

Shanna
I don’t, it wasn’t really a decision. It just kind of happened. Yeah, truly, it just kind of happened.

Kristen
How did you get how did you get started in the bike industry?

Shanna
Um, I was on a whitewater kayaking trip in 2007 in New Zealand. And I came back and didn’t have a job in Asheville and the girl that I had been living with was like, hey, this bike shop in town is looking for a female employee. You need a job, don’t you? And that was like Youngblood Bikes was my in to the bike industry until like, really bikes in general. And when I started working there I had a I was riding a 19 inch Gary Fisher Huku Iku frame and I’m 5″4 – so that’s how much I knew about bikes. It was a really cool experience. I had inventory experience from working in my dad’s auto parts store. And they really needed that. And they opened the bike shop in April and hired me in June. And I found a stack of paperwork from that had never been open since they opened the business. And I was like, Oh, don’t you think maybe you should look at these bills? Yeah. So it was really cool, because he hooked me up with his accountant so that I could do the QuickBooks stuff also does kind of inventory, QuickBooks customer service. And then that QuickBooks experience allowed me to do a lot of other things.

Kristen
That’s interesting, because I think a lot of people when they think a bike industry, they immediately think of like engineering or being a mechanic, but there’s so many different ways to be involved in the bike industry.

Shanna
Absolutely.

Kristen
So So where did you how did your career evolve from there?

Shanna
So while I was working for Young Blood, I, this the guy who owned Endless Bike Company originally started working there. And I would go and help him like fill orders, and, you know, do all that kind of stuff. And one day, he was like, I’m overdoing this. I’m just gonna stop filling orders. And I was like, you can’t take people’s money and not fill their orders, says to me, “Well do you want to buy it?” And I was like, “I don’t have any money.” And he said, “I’ll sell it to you for $1.” So he did, he sold me all of his inventory for $1, which ended up being an $8,500 debt to Industry Nines machine shop turned Amex. And so for five years, I had to find a different machine shop, I went through like two or three different machine shops, which is, is not awesome. And had lots of trouble and would keep getting like my orders bumped for bigger orders. But over those five years, I was able to pay off Industry Nine’s machine shop, and Clint Spiegel, the owner of Industry Nine offered me a job very jacked that I had paid the debt and was like, Oh, do you want a job as our bookkeeper which I had learned all those skills through working for Youngblood and then honed them by running my own business. And then I ran the books for I Nine for three years. Until my I also had a coffee roasting business. Oh, wow. So the coffee business and, and a friend did all of the day to day stuff. And I just did the paperwork for the business and the bookkeeping. So but once like bike parts and bookkeeping for coffee got out of control, I was like, I can’t have a full time job on the side of my two businesses anymore. And I and I left on great terms, we have a great relationship still.

Kristen
For anybody who’s listening who doesn’t already know, what’s Endless Bike Company?

Shanna
So it started as a single-speed, USA made single-speed component company, making single-speed cogs from size 14 to 25 Tooth counts, and a spacer kit. And getting the job with Industry Nine allowed me to add color. So now I offer them in 10 colors. And I also do a core bolt 104 chain rings, 104 96 BCD chain ring, and I do CERAM and raceface direct mount chain rings, there are a few other odds and ends in there. I basically just like I’m not trying to take over the world and I’m not trying to get rich on bike parts. I’m just trying to have some really cool USA made parts that people want to ride that are really nice and really durable. And I think I’m nailing it.

Kristen
I agree. Also pretty too. I love pretty bike parts.

Shanna
And they are so pretty. I am so excited about the chain, right the direct mount chain rings, because they took me like like I’m not an engineer. And the the guy who originally owned the company was my engineer for a while and when the direct mount stuff came out, I was like I want it to look like this. And he’s like, You can’t do that. And so I like stalled and never made it because I didn’t want it to just be like I didn’t want to look like what every other chain ring in the industry looks like I didn’t want just a me too product. I wanted my logo I wanted you to look at that direct mount ring and see my logo. Yeah. So my friend Tom Place who is one of the guys behind Outbound Lighting, and he’s awesome. Um He wanted to design a chain ring for me because he wanted to ride something that he had designed. So he nailed it. My chain ring looks like my logo, we had to add another kind of spoke to it. So it would be terrible. And it’s so nice. I love it. Well done. My logo. It’s so fun. And it’s like this big friend collaboration, it feels like all the time.

Kristen
Very cool. In the last two years, there’s been so much disruption within the bike industry, how have you been affected by that at all?

Shanna
Oh, the price of aluminum is has gone crazy. I’m kind of in this stalled point right now I just placed an order for more chainrings through the shop and in Asheville. And my costs, the parts went up $15. So for as a small, like really small business, like I literally, I’m sitting in my office where all of my bike parts live. It’s like an office office in my house. But that has been the biggest thing is just like the insane price swing that I’m seeing right now. It’s really nice. You know, being having my manufacturer so close, I don’t have to worry about supply chain issues as much as a lot of people do. Like, I don’t have anything sitting in docks anywhere waiting. But it’s more for me, it’s been the price price increases. And that’s the big thing as far as the bike brand.

Kristen
Has that been really important to you to keep the manufacturing local, as opposed to going overseas?

Shanna
Yes, it’s always kind of like been the thing, like all even all my soft goods are USA made. Okay, which I just think. I don’t know, I like. I mean, it’s when we live in a global economy and there, I just like knowing that I can go in and like shake the hand of my maker and you know, pretty much whenever I want and Jr, who does a lot of my machining at tourney. Amex is just a really nice guy. And it’s nice to know that like the money that I spend, like I know all the people’s pockets that it ends up in. Good to be able to do that. And it gives me more control of my process. So like, Yeah, I like that about it.

Kristen
Yeah, absolutely.

Shanna
But it is, it’s hard to do. Because sure, I can send my products to China, and they will probably cost me $5 a piece or $2 a piece to make. But it wouldn’t be the same product.

Kristen
I think, yeah, in addition to obviously being local, I think one of the really amazing things about your company is that it is woman-owned, which we don’t see a lot of in the bike industry. How has it been been a woman in a very male-dominated industry?

Shanna
Well, it’s really interesting. I definitely have had some times when I felt like people don’t hear me. And it’s hard to communicate with and be taken seriously as a like, I’m a small person. And so that and being a woman, I definitely have had some run-ins with the owner of the machine shop where I had to be like, Look, I’m sorry, you can’t talk to me like this. So I’ve really had to like force holding my space. And I found that by doing that, like I have I’m on very good terms now with the machine shop owner and he doesn’t he doesn’t mess with me like he had some times in the past. And he now he takes me I think also leaving Industry Nine put me in a position where now I’m a customer rather than someone who is I mean, I guess an employee put me in a different position. Sure. But as far as like customers and other bike industry people I people allow me to hold my space and they I feel respected in the industry. Definitely by my clients and or Yeah, yeah. Customers or yeah customers and I’m have some like, I have some really dedicated customers who they want to buy my parts because they want to help support me and I love that. And it has been really cool recently like over the past two years really. I’m starting to see more orders come in from women, which I think is really cool. It’s it is a generalization but it’s also like real there aren’t a lot of females who work on their own bikes. Right. And and I hope that I’m seeing these orders coming in like there’s more of them.

Kristen
Yeah, absolutely.

Shanna
That’s, that’s been really cool to see.

Kristen
Have you seen during I’m curious during the pandemic, where there have been so many bikes not in stock, and people will have like, my husband has built up a couple bikes during the last two years. Have you seen more of that? Do you think like people building their own bikes?

Shanna
I think so. I think so. Or they’re taking old bikes that they have laying around. And they’re like, changing them like, oh, this hard tail that I used to ride for whatever, let’s make it single speed and put a rigid fork on it or whatever. Let’s try something different with what they have.

Kristen
Yeah, fun. Yeah. Um, so going back to being a woman-owned business, have you been able to connect with other female-owned businesses in the bike industry?

Shanna
Yes, I have a really great relationship with Shredly, and I just love Ashley, the owner of that company. And then like the the all the gals that put on ROAM Fest, it’s like, if you haven’t been to a ROAM Fest, go. It’s like one of the best feeling weekends of my year every time. So it’s more, but it is more event. Event and like clothing. And then I did just recently was contacted by a woman in Singapore who owns a bike shop. Okay, has been really cool. And she reached out to me because I’m a small woman-owned business. I thought was really cool. That is, but there. And then there was a sweet gal for bag man bag maker, but I don’t run bags on my bike. So I was like, I would love to help you. But it would be a waste on me because I don’t like I carry a bag and don’t do much bike packing. Okay. Yeah. Oh, but yeah, it’s there are it seems like there are more women-owned businesses in the industry starting and it’s I feel like the clothing industry has really started to up the women in the industry game.

Kristen
Yes, absolutely. We’ve had quite a few ladies on who we’ve had Cassie Abel from Wild Rye. We’ve had Jen Kriske from Machines For Freedom. Yeah, definitely seems like that space is starting to be dominated by women-owned businesses and women’s specific clothing brands, which is really cool.

Shanna
Absolutely. Finally, we’ve seen each other and we’re doing we’re doing the work to like, make the industry what we want it to be.

Kristen
Yeah. Which is rad. Also mentioned that you’re friends with Shredly which I just have to mention, for anyone who doesn’t know you have a short named after you. I feel like really, I think like you’ve made it when you have a Shredly short named after you. How cool is that?

Shanna
Oh my God, it was so cool. She, um, she sent me a text the week before she released it. And she’s like, just so you know, I’m about to release the spring line. And I’ve named a short after you. And I was like, Oh my God, it was really, it was really like, still, I’m like, I can’t believe it. We were like, friends from the very first second we met, which was awesome.

Kristen
I love it.

Shanna
Oh, thanks for saying so.

Kristen
Oh, yeah, that’s like my dream, I guess I gotta work towards that one. For women who are listening, who might also want to work in the bike industry, whether that’s owning their own business, or just working in a bike shop, or doing bookkeeping for a bike company, what advice would you have for those women for breaking into the industry?

Shanna
Well apply. If you see the job, and it’s something that interests you, first of all apply. I have a, I have a, I have one particular friend in the industry who we were just talking and he’s like, I just want women to apply for the job. So if you’re interested in doing whatever they’re offering the job apply. That’s the first step. And then once you’re there, hold your space. And don’t be afraid to be like, Hey, that’s not appropriate. When inevitably, someone says something that doesn’t feel good, like, feel free to like, like, don’t be afraid to stand up for yourself, because what the space that we create for ourselves is the space that we’re opening for the other women in the industry. And, and we it starts with us. Yeah. So yeah, just be you be be a strong version of you. And don’t be afraid to try.

Kristen
Absolutely. I love that. I love to that you had mentioned earlier that when you came in, you didn’t have any experience, right? And I think that’s so important because women often think I’m not qualified and I’m not going to apply. And that’s not the case. Like just just apply. Men do it all the time.

Shanna
Absolutely. And sometimes like with the case of working in the bike shop, they just wanted a female vibe and they’re like to like even out the dude vibe that was specifically why they were looking for a woman and like, we make spaces better for women when we’re there.

Kristen
Yes. Switching gears, I’m talking about coaching, you are a mountain bike skills coach, how did you get into that? Why did you choose coaching?

Shanna
Oh my gosh, um, well, I think when I took my first ever clinic, Sue Haywood came down and a lot, one of the local shops put together like a small private group for her to work with. And that was like the start of my Holy, holy moly, this is a thing. And then I took a clinic at Snow Shoe. And that like, was a game-changer for my riding, and meeting the women and like, I got to meet some of the coaches and get like a behind the scenes look. And I was like, this is cool. I want to be friends with these people. Yeah. So then I got to shadow some ladies or volunteer, some Ladies All Ride clinics, which was really cool. And then when I saw a certification course, come up, I was like, I’m just going to try, which is, was, I struggled through that course. I am, I have lifelong has struggled with confidence. And but Sorry, my, your fine. I’ve really always struggled with confidence. So standing in front of a group of people who know what I’m supposed to say always like, kind of puts me in my shell for experience that during during that course. And I had driven down with my friend Harlan who was shadowing to be an instructor of that course. I just really like the vibes of instructors, I think. And I like that. Mountain Bike instructors give people time and space to try things that they wouldn’t necessarily try. Like, yeah, I teach people how to do things and how to do them properly. But I think the biggest part of my job is like, Let’s go session something. And then I stand there and I shoot video. And I’m like, Okay, you could do this differently. Go try it again. And a lot of people male and female ride with just all people they ride with folks who don’t give them time. Or they always the a woman always rides with her boyfriend and they get on the trail and he drops her. And she doesn’t even know that these things can be ridden. And it was like seeing this world was such a game-changer for me. And for my riding, then I was like, I want to be a part of this. I want to I want to be friends with these women and men who are teaching this stuff. And I want to be one of them. And I’m doing it. Like in the fraud police steps and all the time or what there’s another term for it. I call it the fraud police impostor syndrome. Yes. Yeah, I get it. I’m constantly like, No, I am good enough. I’ve done the work to do this. I can do this. And I think that that is also kind of what I do for my clients. Like you’re doing the work. You can do this. Yeah. Let me tell you, when I just showed you how to do it, you’re doing it right. Follow me, you know, whatever it takes. And it brings me joy. It brings me so much joy.

Kristen
I love that you just mentioned that even you have impostor syndrome. Because I think for everybody looking in from the outside, like you are such a good rider, you are so in the industry, and you’re just like the cool girl. So it’s really good to hear that even you have impostor syndrome. And that, you know, we all just need to get over ourselves and go out and ride and have fun.

Shanna
Yeah, and if someone asks you to ride say, Yes. Don’t like oh, no, you don’t want to Yes, yes, they do. Or they wouldn’t have asked. Right. And, and being on. I get excluded from a lot of rides, because Oh, you don’t want to ride with me? I’m like, No, I don’t want to ride by myself. Right? Sometimes I do. But I would rather ride with people. So it’s like, if you want to ride with someone, ask them. And if they asked you to ride go.

Kristen
Yes.

Shanna
That’s like how we improve. And I don’t know, there’s just so many things to just saying yes.

Kristen
I ride with a lot of ladies who have never gone to a camp or a clinic or gotten any kind of skills coaching. Why do you think it’s so important to do that?

Shanna
Oh my gosh, because you don’t know what you don’t know. And I still I take a private lesson every year have I’m scheduling one in July with Karlyn. To work on my I’m still working on some tricks, I want to learn some tricks. I’m also working on my cornering and I’m also working on my coaching. So it’s there’s always something to learn. And we can think we know everything or we can think we can learn it from YouTube, but it there is nothing that takes the place of having someone be like, oh, yeah, no see here on this video where you where you’re putting your butt back. Or in the middle of this jump, you push the bike forward and the front drops, you know, whatever. Like, we just don’t know what, what we don’t know. So it’s awesome to have someone be like, oh, yeah, you can do this better, or you’re doing this awesome. You can improve on this over here.

Kristen
Yes, I love that. That just goes to show no matter where you’re at and how good you are. There’s always room for improvement. And that’s something that’s great about mountain biking, I think because it’s constant room for improvement and to push ourselves and to improve.

Shanna
Yes, and travel. Ride everywhere.

Kristen
Yeah, that too.

Shanna
Every trail is gonna teach you something different. The soil or the rock or the lack of soil?

Kristen
Yeah, that’s such a good point in the – you’re in Brevard, North Carolina, which I’ve been to before and as a West Coast girl, it’s so easy just to stay on the West Coast and ride all the time. I love that. Yes, travel as much as you can and ride different things and everywhere has something so unique and amazing to offer.

Shanna
Absolutely.

Kristen
Um, this year in terms of your coaching business, what kind of offerings do you have?

Shanna
I am doing a clinic once a month, a one day clinic once sorry, two one day clinics, a beginner and then an intermediate at Ride Kanuga every month from April to October. Some of those one event hasn’t been announced yet. And I don’t know if I can mention it, but will take place at my event at Kanuga and then one in October, Thanksgiving will also but this year, I’m also offering one day clinics, one perm, one 2 one-day clinics, a beginner and then an intermediate-advanced at DuPont or Pisco, which I’m excited about because I didn’t do that last year. I just did Kanuga and there’s definitely a want for, for folks to have clinics in Pisco and DuPont. The other thing that I’m doing that I’m really excited about is I’ve taken a weekend per month to ride with the Dirt Skrrts, which is our local. It’s a local nonprofit who is their goal is to just get more women on bikes and on trails. And so I’m excited and I’ve kind of blocked off my calendar to ride with them on a Saturday. And then the following Sunday, I’m doing a it’s more like just a meet up at Ride Kanuga. I’m calling it She Shreds, where we’re just going to meet up at noon, group up. Oh, y’all want to go ride Evergreen and session. Cool, go do that. Oh, y’all want to go Session JNCC? Awesome. Me, I’m gonna go ride Hemlock Epoch today and session that Oh, you want to come? Let’s go. It’s like I’m not teaching. But I’m just creating this space where women can come out and ride with other women and session and work on stuff. Because the thing that I find out there is that women aren’t doing that. They don’t. There’s so few women there still that I’m trying to bring more women into the park. But I’m trying to bring the women that are riding there together so that they can session and figure out because I still think what’s happening is like, they go with their partner or a lot of them go with their, you know, teenage kids who just rip, right? And they like, take they like get end up riding down these really hard technical trails by themselves and they aren’t figuring it out. So I want to change that I want I want to have like a skill-building competence building, but I want it to be a community, a community effort where I’m just gonna bring us together, all you have to do is show up and group up and go. I’m pumped about that.

Kristen
Yeah, I love that. Cool. We’ve seen so many, like I really a proliferation of women’s camps and clinics and which is amazing. But what helps kind of set yours apart, what what makes them unique?

Shanna
Well, I actually, this year, I don’t have women’s only on any of my events except for the She Shreds, okay. I I’m more just want to teach people. I like to teach all people. And I do feel like there’s a space for women’s only events. But I think what I’m working with is I’m getting more private clinics where someone will come to me and be like, hey, I want to put together a group of four to six of my friends. And that’s where the where the women’s clinics kind of come into Okay, me and Um, I’m just doing more like offerings. And so far they’ve been mostly women. But I’m starting to get a few more men trickle in. And I’ll be interested to see how like how that continues? Because I feel like now there are a lot of women’s only options and to learn more too.

Kristen
Oh, yeah, absolutely.

Shanna
I see men do really scary things. And I’m like, I can help.

Kristen
Yeah. Well, I think that sometimes men miss because like women are more cautious. So sometimes we slow down and like really learn the right way to do something. Whereas men are just like, go for it. And they make it the first time and then they’ve never really learned like the correct the correct form, or the correct way of doing it, right.

Shanna
And I do think it’s cool for like women and men to see each other learn, because we’re so different, but you are totally right. Women are going to think about it, and men are just going to send it and they don’t care what it looks like or how it feels or if they’re thriving or just surviving right, or thrive. I guess the Oh, one thing I’m doing this year that I’m super excited about. But I’m also very nervous. And the imposter syndrome is creeping in pretty big time, I have been accepted to go through the course conductor training for the PMBIA as a level one huge, and it’s huge. And it feels like the natural progression for my. So I’ll be teaching some certification courses this year. And I may get to do one in Israel with World Ride, which I’m really excited about. Yeah, but I’m really nervous about the process. I am a self proclaimed, self proclaimed slow learner. Especially when it comes to this is how you say things. So like getting it in my brain and getting myself to be able to verbalize it. I have a lot of anxiety about that. But I can do hard things, and I am doing the hard things. And if it takes me a little longer, I’m totally fine with that. But I, you know, one of my main goals is to be the best mountain bike instructor that I can possibly be. And this is one more step in the process. And I’m scared of it. But I’m doing it.

Kristen
Yes. Good for you. Awesome. You mentioned that PMBIA, which is for anybody who doesn’t know, that’s the program that you go through to become a certified mountain bike skills instructor. For women who are listening who might be interested in doing that, what advice do you have? Or what what point like what skill level do you need to already be at to move forward with doing that?

Shanna
Yeah, so um, PMBIA is a professional mountain bike instructor can be an association. And so to figure out what you need, so if you are interested in all in being a mountain bike instructor, go take a certification course. I really like the PMBIA. Because it’s skills-based teaching, which is like if you’re not positioned and balanced, then or if you don’t have good position and balance, it’s going to be hard to do all these other things. So we start with position and balance and kind of build from there. And all the teaching is skills-based teaching in that way. But if you go on to PMBIA.org website, and on the website, it’s like things that you need to be able to do to take not to take the course but to pass the course like the the skills and maneuvers that you have to be able to perform. But that doesn’t mean you have to go into the course necessarily knowing how to do that. You’re going to learn it through the course. And even if and here’s how I feel about all certification courses, it’s part of our progression. It’s part of our learning. So if you go into the course and you’re like, Oh, I maybe I can’t do all these things. Do it Anyway, have a good attitude, take it as a learning experience. Because you’re going to come back you’re gonna come away with it a better rider and a better instructor, regardless of whether you pass it’s setting you up for the next time. And yeah, you’re just going to I just learned so much every every certification course I take my riding just goes that gets that much better. And your fraud beliefs might kick into and you’re like, I’m, I’m not good enough. I can’t take this course do it anyway, take it anyway, because you’re going to learn something and it’s not that much more expensive than a lot of private instruction or clinics. And you’re gonna get you know, they do small courses. So at the most you might have six or eight other people in your course. You’re gonna watch them learn. It’s just just do it. Don’t don’t not do it. Just do it.

Kristen
Yeah. I had Lindsey Richter on the podcast. And she talked about how that was really how she became a great rider was doing the PMBIA classes and which was eye-opening to me because I was just like, Oh, of course, you have to be an amazing rider before you ever start trying this?

Shanna
No. And you know, and I went, I took the PMBIA, level two in Whistler with Lindsey. Yes. But I learned so much. And it set me up to figure out what I needed to learn. So then, after that, I went and I took a Heartland came down from Virginia, and, and we kind of set like weekend up around me as like, we did an entire day of coaching instruction, where he helped me with my coaching. And then we did the whole weekend, we did a clinic. And we worked on on teaching, and he gave me opportunities to teach and opportunities to watch him learn or watch him teach. And that like I did a lot of work on my coaching. So that then I could take the level two again, and I passed. Yeah. Even and the fraud police still crept in. They’re always there for me. I don’t know.

Kristen
I like that. I’ve never heard of fraud police before. I’m gonna use that from now on.

Shanna
Yeah, you just got to ignore the fraud police and just do it anyway.

Kristen
Love it. I’m almost out of time. I’ve got three final questions for you. And before that, for anybody who’s listening who would like to come pick one of your clinics or wants to check out Endless Bike Company? Where can they connect with you and find you online?

Shanna
I’m on Instagram @endlessbikegirl as well as @endlessbikeco if you’re looking for the component business, I’m a little I’m a little more active on my endless bike girl account. And then if you’re looking for instruction, endlessbikegirlmountainbikeskills.com, and my component website is endlessbikes.com. And you can email me I’m the only one on the other end of both emails. So.

Kristen
And she’s very responsive as I learned. Final three questions. The first one is what bike or bikes do you ride?

Shanna
I am riding a Transition Spur and a Transition Sentinel kind of depending on my lessons and where we’re riding, and I love them both.

Kristen
Second question is: What is your favorite place you’ve ever ridden your bike?

Shanna
Oh my god, I’ve been thinking about this for weeks, it’s so hard. I will have to say I got to do a trip to Nepal a few years ago. And it is absolutely phenomenal to climb into the Himalayas, on your bicycle, and then get to shred on what people use as foot paths like commuter paths. It was just, it’s a phenomenal place to like the riding was great because it’s all these technical foot paths. But the people were just amazing. And it the scenery just cannot be topped. Don’t eat meat in the mountains. But other than that, it’s a great trip. But there are so many places.

Kristen
Oh yeah. And I like that. You mentioned that earlier. Just traveling. Having the bike be an avenue for a reason to go travel is so great. That’s so good. I have one final question for you. But first, I just wanted to say thank you for being such a good role model for all women in the bike industry and just being a trailblazer and being awesome. And yeah, don’t let the imposter police get you down because the rest of us feel like we’ll never be as cool as you. Last question is: What is your favorite thing about biking?

Shanna
Oh my gosh, it is a place in my life where I have the most confidence. Like I am free. I can be me and you see it I am me on my bike. And and that’s what I love about it. I can just be 100% authentically me and be absolutely confident in my skin.

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A podcast for women who love bicycles! We we celebrate all forms of riding and all forms of women, so whether you’re a road cyclist, mountain biker, or bike commuter, you’ll find your community here. Each week we’ll week bring you interviews from inspiring women, and offer tips and tricks to help you thrive on the bike.

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